Below you will find the answers to your questions...

We offer worldwide shipping.
We accept PayPal for the security of the transaction. In case if you don't have PayPal, you can pay with your Visa / Mastercard at checkout. Do not hesitate to contact us for instructions.

As your 100% satisfaction is important for us we offer a 14-days Return.

To complete your return, please email support@thetimelesswatches.net with the subject 'Returns' and include your order number, name and the reason for the return. We will provide you with instructions on where to send returned goods.

The refund is processed right after the product is returned to us.
You will receive a Shipment Confirmation email once your order has shipped containing your tracking number(s). The tracking number will be active within 24 hours.
If you would like to cancel your order, please contact us via email support@thetimelesswatches.net or messenger set on our website.
The Timeless Watches is not responsible for any customs and taxes applied to your order. All fees imposed during or after shipping are the responsibility of the customer (tariffs, taxes, etc.).
All orders are processed within 2 business days. Orders are not shipped or delivered on weekends or holidays. Please allow additional days in transit for delivery. If there will be a significant delay in shipment of your order, we will contact you via email or telephone.
Our product is very delicate and it can get damaged (e.g. the watch might start losing time) during transportation. If you received your order damaged, please contact us. The Timeless Watches can offer you a free repair or full refund upon return.

Let us start by saying that a vintage watch is designed to be worn, shared and enjoyed, so our best advice is to rotate and wear each of your vintage watches (with the care and respect they deserve) as much as possible.

If you must store them for a prolonged period of time, find a safe, dark and dry location and wind them fully at regular intervals, at least once a month. This will help keep the parts well lubricated and allow the watch to function reliably for years.

We also suggest that you have your watch serviced by a quality watchmaker (not the jeweler in the mall) every three to five years. Service should include cleaning, lubricating, regulating and gasket inspection.

We use old authentic pocket watch movements only to create our watches. The other parts, like case and dial, are not original but hand-crafted by our team of qualified watchmakers and jewelers.
No, our watches are neither water-resistant nor dustproof/shockproof.
No, we don't have and we don't provide any proof of authenticity as all the movements we use to create our watches were found on different online marketplaces or flea markets.
Like any other old or modern watch, it needs to be serviced approximately once in every 2 years.
To wind the mechanical watch, you have to gently turn the crown before the very end. Winding any mechanical watch tight may break the mainspring. If you can avoid it, do not wind the watch hard. Normally the watch has to be winded once a day.
When adjusting the hands of your watch, move them in a clockwise direction only. Counter-clockwise adjustments may damage the movement. If you must adjust counter-clockwise, make it for small adjustments only (i.e. for minutes, NOT hours).
Many earlier watches were not cased at the factory. With only a few exceptions, the watch movements were made to industry standard sizes and cases were made to those same sizes. Only a few of the companies that made the watch movements also made the cases, and when they did, they would frequently be sold separately.

A person would go to the jewelry store, select the make and grade (quality) of the movement they desired, and then pick out a case, or perhaps they would choose a certain quality of case and then use the balance of their budget on the movement. The jeweler would then assemble the two in a matter of moments.

Even when watches were cased at the watch factory, the same model case might be fitted onto any variety of movements, or the same model/grade of movement would be put in a variety of cases. Whichever set of circumstances occurred, the best documentation available is for the movements, not the cases. Thus, it is through the movement that a watch's identification can be made. The serial number on the movement can also date the watch. You can find them here.

The best advice is not to open your watchcase unless you have a compelling reason to do so.

If you must open it, stop if the case lid seems stuck after normal amounts of effort has been expended, and take it to a watchmaker.

Before attempting to take off the back, make sure you are seated at a table with an ample and reasonably cushioned surface area in front of you. A mouse pad works well. Most watches have either screw-on or snap-on cases. Screw-on cases are of more recent vintage and typically have a number of groves around the back edge of the case.

There are special tools to remove these types of cases, and you should not try without these tools. Either buy yourself the right tool or take it to a watchmaker. However, the vast majority of vintage watches have snap-on case lids.

First thing is to examine all the way around the back lid to try to understand the construction and to see if there is a “natural” place (i.e. a little grove or slight gap) to focus your efforts. It is worth trying the fingernail approach first as we’ve found that this works about half the time or so. In any case, it’s worth a try since fingernails are soft and is unlikely to damage the case, or worse, the movement inside. If this doesn’t work, there are tools specifically made to be case openers. If a case opener isn't available, we recommend something not too sharp but with a good thin edge. Most Swiss pocket knifes have a good small blade well suited for this purpose. But be careful and do not use excessive force for knives are sharp and are known to slip and cut.

Set the watch face down on your mouse pad and use a low stool so that you can look closely at what you're doing without bending over too much. If you're right-handed, hold the knife, in your right hand, with the sharp edge in the slot.

Then, use your left thumb against the back edge of the knife to hold the knife in the slot. Using moderate force only, rotate the knife handle a little in each direction to "pop" the back off. Only wrist action should be used. Keep your elbows tight to your body. Using wrist action only will avoid potential knife slippage and scratching or damage to the case and movement. Keep the knife parallel to the tabletop and to the watch.

If this doesn't work, it’s time to visit your watchmaker.

If this proves successful, we suggest you take some good close up pictures of the movement to record it for future use and reference.

If you don’t have a camera, write down all serial numbers and other markings on the movement.

%HHours
%MMinutes
%SSeconds
%-dDays
%HHours
%MMinutes
%SSeconds
%-wWeeks
%-dDays
%HHours
%MMinutes
%SSeconds
%HHours
%MMinutes
%SSeconds
%-dDays
%HHours
%MMinutes
%SSeconds
%-wWeeks
%-dDays
%HHours
%MMinutes
%SSeconds
Close

Your cart

Your cart is currently empty.